Sociologist Norbert Wiley on the Pragmatist Notion of the Self as a Process

Sociologist Norbert Wiley on the Pragmatist Notion of the Self as a Process

This is worth seeing. I am very impressed with Norbert Wiley's book The Semiotic Self. I have used it in seminars with advanced students ("senior" fourth year students, M.A. students and Ph.D. students). What Professor Wiley says here is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of the depth of understanding in his book. Essentially, he combines insights from C. S. Peirce on the "I" and the "you" (or "thou") and insights from George Herbert Mead on the "I" and the "me." I myself prefer to call it the "me-I-you" model, with "me" being our socialized self (mainly in the past), "I" being the self in the here and now (with two aspects, the evident and the spiritual, more hidden part of the "soul") and the "you" (to some extent our image of ourselves in the next minute, the next hour, the next week, etc.). The human "self" is a process, an on-going "dialogue" (internal and external). This fits in with my ideas about "Peirce's Wagers" being a good way to look at spirituality and religion. Wiley refers to it as "Me, Myself, and I." But that partially obscures the on-going dialogue of the "me-I-you" every minute. However, that is a very minor point. I would like to say "me, myself, I, and you/thou" but that gets a bit awkward and wordy. The "myself" would be a good way to talk about that aspect of the "I" that is more than just fleeting, something we might call "character" or "personality." There is so much value in Wiley's book. It should be more widely known and read. It is a classic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7m4m0EFDzms&feature=share